Home to Delphi

My author visit to Delphi, Indiana on Monday, April 7
I spoke to three groups of 100+ students at Delphi Middle/High School.

I spoke to three groups of 100+ students at Delphi Middle/High School.

When public librarian Lauren and middle school librarian Bernadette invited me to visit their students a Delphi, Indiana, I thought is would be kind of a cool thing. When I got there Monday, I was delighted to find such a welcoming crowd. One girl said “Hi, Chris Everheart!” when I walked in the door.

Full disclosure: I hadn’t done my homework and didn’t know that their school mascot is The Oracles! What could be better than bringing a thriller story about a 3,000-year-old conspiracy involving teenagers and the Oracle at Delphi to a group of kids living in Delphi, Indiana?

Reading to the teens at Delphi Public Library.

Reading to the teens at Delphi Public Library.

After an afternoon of school visits, the public library put on an event with a group of kids who’d all read the book and made trailer videos. That was a blast! In thanks, I read the entire short story The Shadow of Delphi: A Short Delphi Prequel. (I think they liked it.)

I have to admit that I was a little overcome at one point. These kids had put a lot of attention on the Delphi books I and II – and are hollering for number III – and I felt like I was bringing this project home. That was really special.

I only hope I gave the kids at Delphi as much as they gave me.

 

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 reasons to visit Delphi, Indiana instead of Delphi, Greece:

  1. You don’t have to bring a gold statue to get into town.
  2. A Hyundai and a GPS can get you there – and back home.
  3. Instead of a scary oracle in the Adyton, there’s a Dairy Queen on Main Street!

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

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The Product of Failure

The gift of struggle in learning – and how getting it wrong can actually pay off.
Struggle now can pay off later - he hopes ...

Struggle now can pay off later … he hopes.

A superb article by education writer Annie Murphy Paul caught my attention this week - When, And How, To Let Learners Struggle. Murphy Paul reports on a study published in the Journal of the Learning Sciences called “Designing for Productive Failure” that shows mind-bending results.

In the study, two groups of kids were given a mathematical problem to solve – and it might surprise you to learn that the group who got the answer right scored lower when tested on “what they learned” than the kids who got the answer wrong!

How can this be? It’s in the experience the kids had – not the answer they reached. Group 1 was given extensive support by a teacher and ultimately led to the correct answer. I’ll bet they felt pretty good about it.

Group 2, on the other hand, was “… directed to solve the same problems by collaborating with one another, absent any prompts from their instructor. … in the course of trying to do so, they generated a lot of ideas about the nature of the problems and about what potential solutions would look like. And when the two groups were tested on what they’d learned, the second group ‘significantly outperformed’ the first.” I wonder if the kids were as surprised as I am.

Reminds me of the axiom that if you help a butterfly emerge from its chrysalis, you rob it of the wall-busting strength it must develop to survive in the outside world.

I’m assuming that even though Group 2 was not given significant help from their teacher, it’s likely that their learning environment was overall supportive and healthy. If an adult had been standing by blowing a whistle and shouting insults every time Group 2 went “offtrack,” you can imagine the kind of confusion and self-mistrust those kids might have developed. Such a negative feedback environment might have pushed the “what they learned” score down significantly. So, environment must matter too.

The point of the “productive failure” observation is to point out how kids can learn confidence in their creativity and thinking skills even if the exact correct answers to questions and problems elude them. (A reflection on some Common Core methods here?)

It goes for adults too. I have a friend in business who says, “Fail fast.” In other words: We know we’re going to fail on some levels. It’s an experience we must have to get smarter and sharper and ultimately become successful. So get through the failing process as quickly as possible and get on to the success. You can’t do that unless you have a “healthy” attitude toward failure.

I struggled a lot with learning as a youth. I think that, unfortunately, I had the idea that failure was permanent. (Anyone else out there have a negative feedback environment?) As a curious and driven adult, it’s taken me years of inside work and outside experience to befriend failure and learn from it. The results: more self-trust; the ability to laugh at myself when I “fail”; the ability to work quickly through the process of grief over bad experiences; the overall sense that whatever “this” is, it’s not permanent; a sense of ultimate success through building on repeated “failures.”

I’m not happy about my childhood learning struggles, but I do see the value in the creative analysis of subjects and problems that I developed as a result. Author Simon Sinek says that the “survival” skills we develop as children to make up for our deficiencies become our greatest assets as adults. In our youthful creativity we develop personal ways of learning, working, and communicating which are unique to the individual – and much needed by the world – later in life.

I’ve always struggled to some degree with reading – but I somehow became an author! I’ve come to believe that one of the things that makes me an effective writer is the fact that I read slowly, trying not to miss any of the content, and have unconsciously picked up on a lot more information about writing style, grammar, voice, etc.

So, maybe the trade-off is worth it. The earlier we understand the true nature of “failure” and befriend it, the better off we can be throughout the rest of our lives – whenever the rest of our lives begins.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 other ways failure makes the world better:

  1. You think those geniuses got the Twinky right on the first try? Yum!
  2. I’ve never heard someone say, “If at first you don’t succeed … ah, forget it!”
  3. We never would have had all those iPhone 1 jokes to laugh at.

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

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Duking it Out

Who’ll take the belt – upstart digital or good ol’ print?
Digital and print go toe-to-toe on the shifting canvas of today's market.

Digital and print go toe-to-toe on the shifting canvas of today’s market.

A couple of articles grabbed my attention this week – just for seeming so different from each other.

The Christian Science Monitor posted a story about America’s first bookless library. You read that right – a library without books in San Antonio, TX is packing the patrons in from around town and around the world. I’m not a “this changes everything” kind of guy, but “… stocked with 10,000 e-books, 500 e-readers, 48 computers, and 20 iPads and laptops, the $2.3 million library has been compared countless times to an Apple Store with its rows of glossy devices.” The Biblio-Tech definitely looks like the future we were promised in the early-80′s of a future paperless society.

It’s weird because, even though I’ve always been fascinated by the concept of a paperless society, when I think of libraries, I get images of the Library at Alexandria or Green Town’s library in Ray Bradbury’s “Something Wicked This Way Comes” (which I picture as a classic Carnegie library). These are buildings stocked with books. Bookie-books. Paper books!

But there’s good news for the old champ, because PBS reports that “Americans prefer print books over e-books” based on recent Pew Research polls. Only three in ten adults polled read an e-book in the past year, while seven in ten read a book in paper. The amazing thing is that half of those adults polled own a tablet or e-reader on which they could read e-books, but they still prefer paper. So maybe Alexandria and Green Town will stay in the bookie-book business.

Elephant books.

Elephant books.

Yes, there’s an elephant in the room. How are the kids reading? Scholastic reports that kids are reading e-books, but still overwhelmingly prefer print books. In my work writing, promoting, and selling youth books, I’m learning that e-books are becoming more relevant but print books don’t seem to be going anywhere. I remember as kid liking the idea of owning a book (and I didn’t love reading back then). According to librarians and teachers, this hasn’t changed. Kids like books.

Holding and owning a book is still important to the little ones – and, apparently, the big ones too. So let’s not do the digital count on the old hardcover pug yet.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 differences between an all-digital library and an all-print library:

  1. You can’t get electrocuted spilling coffee on a print book.
  2. Turning out the lights in an all-print library = no more reading.
  3. Read the pages or read the pixels – your choice.

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

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Cover to Dusty Cover (Dusted Off)

The secret ancient library behind the walls of the world’s oldest monastery.//

The fortress-like Saint Catherine’s Monastery at Mt. Sinai houses the world’s oldest continually operating library. -SacredSites.com

Bloggers note: I’ve been visiting a lot of libraries lately but none as old as this old, old, old library. This a re-post of a piece I wrote a while back. Enjoy.

Ever heard of the Sacred and Imperial Monastery of the God-Trodden Mount of Sinai? No? It’s also known as Saint Catherine’s Monastery. Nothing?

If you haven’t heard of it, that’s because this ancient monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai is so remote that until modern times only the most devout of seekers could get there via ten-day camel ride.

The monastery was built in the mid-6th century AD at what is considered to be the spot where Moses saw the burning bush. Known to have been occupied by Christians since at least as far back as the 4th century AD, the site, in fact, claims to host the original living bush that Moses witnessed.

Monk studying at Saint Catherine’s Monastery library – among the world’s most exclusive libraries. -beautiful-libraries.com

Just as amazing is that Saint Catherine’s also claims the worlds oldest continually operating library, stuffed with 5,000 early books, 3,500 manuscripts and 2,000 scrolls – a collection rivaled only by the Vatican. This is also one of the most exclusive libraries in the world. Only the monks of the monastery and select clergy and scholars are allowed in.

I am so fascinated with libraries – especially old ones – that I made a monolithic, centuries-old library the central battleground of my thriller The League of Delphi. And the fact that this library is surrounded by a virtual fortress makes it ten times more fascinating and meaningful to the story.

After a millenium and a half of cloistered existence Saint Catherine’s is now bringing the collection to the world through the tools of the digital age but the library itself remains inaccessible to most outsiders.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 books you might find in the world’s oldest library:

  1. Twilight: The Dawn of History
  2. The Genghis Khan Cookbook: Feeding a Band of Marauding Barbarians on a Budget
  3. Fifty Shades of Black: A Monk’s Wardrobe Confessions

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

Paperback amazon Delphi Deception

Delphi 2 kindle

Ingram Delphi Deception

-

What librarians are saying about The Delphi Trilogy:

“The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart is super suspenseful and unputdownable in the best sense of the word. A great readalike for kids who have plowed through Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games. We have multiple copies of the book and they have not been on the shelf since we bought them. Teen patrons have loved The League of Delphi.” – Hannahlily Smith, Teen Coordinator, Johnson City Public Library, Johnson City, TN.

“Fast-paced and well written, this thrilling mystery sucks readers in and leaves them anxiously waiting for the next installment of the trilogy. This is exactly the type of book teens enjoy and it will draw in even the most reluctant readers.” – Kiersten Doucette, Teen Services Librarian, Naperville Public Library, Naperville, IL

Readers rave about The Delphi Trilogy:

“Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”

“It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense… and very well written characters.”

“From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”

“Even the most reluctant of reluctant readers will have a hard time putting these books down.”

Related articles
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100 Libraries – Done

100 libraries by year’s end – check. Now what?
The final frontier - SE Kentucky, SW Virginia and NE Tennessee.

The final frontier – SE Kentucky, SW Virginia and NE Tennessee.

Happy Old Year! And 2013 was a happy one for one maniac with a car, a map of libraries, and a book to give away. (I’m the maniac.) The 100-Library Tour was officially accomplished last Monday, December 30th and I couldn’t be more excited. Did I say exhausted? Because I needed a day or two to recover.

If you’ve never been to Southeastern Kentucky or Southwestern Virginia, there are two things you need to know – one: there are big, big mountains between towns; and two: there are great libraries and librarians.

With nine libraries to go, my friend Scott and I set out New Years Eve-eve to hit the century mark before the ball dropped – next day at midnight (OK, maybe I didn’t cut it that close). We drove down interstates, onto US highways, via state byways, over mountains, through forests, and past coal mines.

Around 11AM had a great visit with the ladies at the Scott County Library in Gate City, VA. They work with the high school on reading programs and asked if I could come back for a visit with the kids. I can’t wait!

After a drop-in at Pennington Gap, VA, we went on to Harlan, KY. They have newly remodeled library downtown that still smells like paint. Don’t take my word for it – pay them a visit. They now have The League of Delphi: Book I of The Delphi Trilogy on their teen shelf, too.

We visited the library at Cumberland, KY then went up, up, up a mountain then down into a valley to Whitesburg, KY. They’re way up there in the mountains and have a big library with very active youth reading programs. I was glad to give Vicki a book for her teens. Next was Neon, KY (not a joke – check the picture), followed by Jenkins, KY and Wise, VA.

ONE MORE TO GO! But it was getting late. We stopped in Big Stone Gap, VA at 5:01 – one minute after library closing. Argh!

#100 Traci and Cindy at the Mt. Carmel, TN library. Thanks, guys!

#100 Traci and Cindy at the Mt. Carmel, TN library. Thanks, guys!

Luckily, I had scoped out a safety. The tiny city library at Mt. Carmel, TN was a godsend, open until 8PM – and Lucky Number 100! Cindy and Traci welcomed me with open arms and seemed delighted to top off the library tour. I’m so grateful for their participation and hope I can return the favor sometime.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Libraries give our communities so much all year. Please consider supporting your local library. If you’re looking for a fun way to do that, check out Geek the Library.

Want to know how all this got started? Check it out hereSee photos on Facebook.

Happy New Year, everyone! If I visited your library last year, thank you. If I didn’t visit you, I hope I get a chance to see you soon.

I hope 2014 is a great year for you, full of love and opportunity.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 things to do after you visit 100 libraries:

  1. Hurry up and return all those overdue books. People are going to jail for that kind of procrastination these days!
  2. Get new tires. The mountain library drives are killer on the treads.
  3. Take a nap – in the 920 section where it’s always quiet.

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SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

Paperback amazon Delphi Deception

Delphi 2 kindle

Ingram Delphi Deception

-

What librarians are saying about The Delphi Trilogy:

“The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart is super suspenseful and unputdownable in the best sense of the word. A great readalike for kids who have plowed through Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games. We have multiple copies of the book and they have not been on the shelf since we bought them. Teen patrons have loved The League of Delphi.” – Hannahlily Smith, Teen Coordinator, Johnson City Public Library, Johnson City, TN.

“Fast-paced and well written, this thrilling mystery sucks readers in and leaves them anxiously waiting for the next installment of the trilogy. This is exactly the type of book teens enjoy and it will draw in even the most reluctant readers.” – Kiersten Doucette, Teen Services Librarian, Naperville Public Library, Naperville, IL

Readers rave about The Delphi Trilogy:

“Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”

“It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense… and very well written characters.”

“From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”

“Even the most reluctant of reluctant readers will have a hard time putting these books down.”

Categories: Libraries, Readers, Reluctant Readers, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Keeps on Giving

The gift of 90 libraries.
Western North Carolina libraries have been good to me and The Delphi Trilogy.

Western North Carolina libraries have been good to me and The Delphi Trilogy.

Two weeks since my last library update? How did that happen? Oh, I know – I’ve been busy writing more books!

This week I just want to give a quick update of the 100-Library Tour and wish you all a Merry Christmas. I was invited to the Independence Regional Library in Charlotte on December 11 to talk with their teens about what it’s like being a writer.

I was reminded of my favorite writing quote by the old-school Hollywood screenwriter Gene Fowler – “Writing is easy: All you do is sit staring at a blank piece of paper until drops of blood form on your forehead.”

Don’t worry, I didn’t say that to them. I did explain some of the tools of creativity, show them some books that I’ve used to enhance my creativity, and – most importantly – encouraged them to discover their passion and indulge in it, develop it, and pursue it. “Your passion is priceless,” I told them. I hope it inspires them to be creative in anything they do and to do it for and with love.

On the way there, I visited the public library and the Middle School in Weaverville, NC and gave them each a copy of The League of Delphi: Book I of The Delphi Trilogy for their collections. I hope they enjoy them. A quick stop in Gastonia, NC as I sped toward Charlotte added another book to their YA collection too.

I’ve been at my desk working on two books. A graphic novel adaptation of Jules Verne’s “Around the World in Eighty Days” and a quick 10,000-word urban mystery book for middle-graders. Both are going great.

Giving back - one song at a time. $20 karaoke winnings goes to Johnson City Public LIbrary teen book clubs.

Giving back – one song at a time. $20 karaoke winnings goes to Johnson City Public LIbrary teen book clubs.

I also finally collected my karaoke winnings from the South Carolina Library Association conference and donated the $20 cash money to the teen reading program at the Johnson City Public Library.

Libraries give our communities so much all year. Please consider supporting your local library this holiday season. Looking for a fun way to do that? Check out Geek the Library.

Here’s the count: The Independence library was number 90 on my way to 100! Just 10 more to go before New Year’s Day. Almost there.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, everyone!

Want to know how all this got started? Check it out here.

Also, follow my progress in photos on Facebook.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 ways to celebrate with your library at Christmas time:

  1. Go to the library’s DVD shelf and try to find a copy of “A Christmas Story” “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” or “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Go ahead, try.
  2. Make an origami Christmas tree out of an old copy of War and Peace.
  3. Check out a book and don’t return it until “next year.”

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SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

Paperback amazon Delphi Deception

Delphi 2 kindle

Ingram Delphi Deception

-

What librarians are saying about The Delphi Trilogy:

“The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart is super suspenseful and unputdownable in the best sense of the word. A great readalike for kids who have plowed through Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games. We have multiple copies of the book and they have not been on the shelf since we bought them. Teen patrons have loved The League of Delphi.” – Hannahlily Smith, Teen Coordinator, Johnson City Public Library, Johnson City, TN.

“Fast-paced and well written, this thrilling mystery sucks readers in and leaves them anxiously waiting for the next installment of the trilogy. This is exactly the type of book teens enjoy and it will draw in even the most reluctant readers.” – Kiersten Doucette, Teen Services Librarian, Naperville Public Library, Naperville, IL

Readers rave about The Delphi Trilogy:

“Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”

“It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense… and very well written characters.”

“From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”

“Even the most reluctant of reluctant readers will have a hard time putting these books down.”

Categories: Libraries, Readers, Reluctant Readers, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Library Days, Library Nights

Trying to catch up with my library-visiting self.
Visited a few in the backyard and a few along the trail.

Visited a few in the backyard and a few along the trail.

The weekend before Thanksgiving I made a run up to Chicago to do a little business. I visited some libraries and schools along the way as part of my 100-Library Tour. Before I left I made a run up to Abingdon, VA and visited their schools and libraries.

At Abingdon High School, Virginia welcomed me to her comfortable and active library. We had a great talk about teen reading and she got a copy of The League of Delphi: Book I of The Delphi Trilogy for her shelf. And she made sure I visited Stanley Middle School and the Washington County Public Library while I was in town. I hope to visit again for a reading program.

Then I saddled up and headed north (where, yes, it was cold – still is). Along the way I visited the Knox Appalachian School in Barbourville, KY and donated some books for their collection. This is a residential school for kids who are trying to get their lives back on track. Jennifer, the English teacher, was very excited because her library is expanding and the teens are diving into reading. I hope to do a group event sometime for the teens.

I stopped at Madison County Library in Berea, KY and delivered a book to Pat then went on to Williamstown, KY and Grant County Public Library. I’d wanted to visit them last time I was in the area but missed their closing time.

It was near nightfall when I reached the Miami Township Branch of the Cincinnati and Hamilton County Public Library. I’m glad I stopped by. Had a great talk with Branch Manager Carrie, who used to be a teen services librarian. She promised to send The League of Delphi on to circulation and I was just informed today that it has been shelved. So, read on, Cincy!

In addition to my many school and library visits I’ve met some great people at the North Carolina Library Association conference in Winston-Salem, the Virginia Association of School Librarians conference in Williamsburg, and the Southeastern Library Association conference in Greeneville, SC and we’ve been staying in touch. I’m so glad I embarked on this tour. 

What’s the count? 86 of 100 so far.

Next week, I head off to Charlotte for an author visit with the teens at the Independence Brach.

Want to know how all this got started? Check it out here.

Also, follow my progress in photos on Facebook.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 things no one told me about a 100-library tour :

  1. Do not fear: librarians are way nicer than they were when you were a kid.
  2. Your tour will take you to Miami – no, not that Miami – don’t be ridiculous!
  3. You will deliberately travel north into the frozen tundra to meet your goal. Luckily, you get to escape south again.

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SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

Paperback amazon Delphi Deception

Delphi 2 kindle

Ingram Delphi Deception

-

What librarians are saying about The Delphi Trilogy:

“The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart is super suspenseful and unputdownable in the best sense of the word. A great readalike for kids who have plowed through Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games. We have multiple copies of the book and they have not been on the shelf since we bought them. Teen patrons have loved The League of Delphi.” – Hannahlily Smith, Teen Coordinator, Johnson City Public Library, Johnson City, TN.

“Fast-paced and well written, this thrilling mystery sucks readers in and leaves them anxiously waiting for the next installment of the trilogy. This is exactly the type of book teens enjoy and it will draw in even the most reluctant readers.” – Kiersten Doucette, Teen Services Librarian, Naperville Public Library, Naperville, IL

Readers rave about The Delphi Trilogy:

“Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”

“It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense… and very well written characters.”

“From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”

“Even the most reluctant of reluctant readers will have a hard time putting these books down.”

Categories: Libraries, Readers, Reluctant Readers, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Dear Teen Me

The letter I didn’t want to write to my young self, but glad I did
Portrait of the author-to-be with a killer instinct.

Portrait of the author-to-be with a killer instinct.

I’d call this breaking news, the fact that I’m featured on Dear Teen Me this week, but the subject matter is so old (does that make me old too?) that it seems like it should be called “not-too-distant history.”

Click here to read the letter.

There’s one thing I learned from writing for Dear Teen Me: the feelings and fears and hopes of the kid I once was are not too far beneath the surface of who I am today. I think that’s a good thing.

Enjoy! (if you dare)

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 other things I learned writing a letter to my 14-year-old self:

  1. I don’t exactly feel old, but I definitely don’t look that young anymore.
  2. And here I though I’d forgotten everything I wrote in my journal!
  3. Purple is still my color.

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SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

Paperback amazon Delphi Deception

Delphi 2 kindle

Ingram Delphi Deception

-

What librarians are saying about The Delphi Trilogy:

“The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart is super suspenseful and unputdownable in the best sense of the word. A great readalike for kids who have plowed through Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games. We have multiple copies of the book and they have not been on the shelf since we bought them. Teen patrons have loved The League of Delphi.” – Hannahlily Smith, Teen Coordinator, Johnson City Public Library, Johnson City, TN.

“Fast-paced and well written, this thrilling mystery sucks readers in and leaves them anxiously waiting for the next installment of the trilogy. This is exactly the type of book teens enjoy and it will draw in even the most reluctant readers.” – Kiersten Doucette, Teen Services Librarian, Naperville Public Library, Naperville, IL

Readers rave about The Delphi Trilogy:

“Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”

“It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense… and very well written characters.”

“From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”

“Even the most reluctant of reluctant readers will have a hard time putting these books down.”

Related articles
Categories: Uncategorized, Writing | Leave a comment

Rousing the Reading Rabble

This week’s update on my effort to incite excitement for books one library at a time
Clowning outside the Sylva, NC Jackson County Public Library.

Clowning outside the Sylva, NC Jackson County Public Library.

If I’m getting a little tired, it’s only between library visits, not during them. I love meeting librarians and seeing their libraries. I’m glad I started this adventure. I’m up to 79 as of this week!

I visited 15 libraries in the past week on the 100-Library Tour. North Carolina and South Carolina community and school libraries got copies of The League of Delphi for their teen collections and the author got even more jazzed about libraries.

Last week I went to the Southeastern Library Association / South Carolina Library Association joint conference in Greenville. Met a lot of great people from all over the region and won the karaoke contest. Yep, I not only write, I sing too! (First prize was $20, which will go to my local library’s teen book clubs.)

Karaoke champions are just people like you and me. Well, probably more like me than you.

Karaoke champions are just people like you and me. Well, probably more like me than you.

Greenville, SC is less than three hours’ drive from home, so stopping along the way in Hendersonville, NC was easy. I visited the county library, where Loree told me about their teen programs and how they’re trying to grow them. Then I stopped at several area middle schools and a high school. The standout was Rugby Middle School, where librarian Karen is dong lots of great things – including a family reading night.

I also visited schools and libraries in the Greenville/Travelers Rest, SC area. At Travelers Rest High School, Deanna and Ashley are fairly new and young librarians who are connecting their teens with books and have created a fun lunchtime book club. I’d love to sit on one of their book discussions.

Monday, I visited Western North Carolina with my friend Scott in the passenger seat. I started at Mars Hill, where I met Melissa, who’s from Wisconsin (I’m from Minnesota) and went to the same college as my step-son. They have a beautifully remodeled library and are looking to build up their teen reading programs. I hope I can help out.

My new friend author/poet/performer/educator Allan Wolf met me for coffee in West Asheville. We had a great talk about publishing and school visits. Thanks Allan!

Librarians are so nice! With my friend Ellen at Macon County Library, Franklin, NC.

Librarians are so nice! With my friend Ellen at Macon County Library, Franklin, NC.

After a quick visit with Karen at the West Asheville Library, Scott and I headed outstate to visit librarian friends I met at the North Carolina Library Association conference in September. It was well worth the trip, visiting schools and libraries there and back. The highlight was delivering a book to Ellen and Kristina at the Macon County Library in Franklin, NC and giving and informal book talk to a couple of their teen writers.

The tour continues this week. A couple of area schools Thursday then a weekend trip to the Chicago area. Somebody stop me. No don’t! I’m so close to 100!

Want to know how all this got started? Check it out here.

Also, follow my progress in photos on Facebook.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 things I’ve noticed while visiting 100 librarians:

  1. Librarians smile when you give them a free book. They also smile when you check out a book they love.
  2. People relax in libraries. I haven’t seen an angry library-goer yet.
  3. Ask a librarian is more than a slogan. It’s a way of life.

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SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

Paperback amazon Delphi Deception

Delphi 2 kindle

Ingram Delphi Deception

-

What librarians are saying about The Delphi Trilogy:

“The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart is super suspenseful and unputdownable in the best sense of the word. A great readalike for kids who have plowed through Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games. We have multiple copies of the book and they have not been on the shelf since we bought them. Teen patrons have loved The League of Delphi.” – Hannahlily Smith, Teen Coordinator, Johnson City Public Library, Johnson City, TN.

“Fast-paced and well written, this thrilling mystery sucks readers in and leaves them anxiously waiting for the next installment of the trilogy. This is exactly the type of book teens enjoy and it will draw in even the most reluctant readers.” – Kiersten Doucette, Teen Services Librarian, Naperville Public Library, Naperville, IL

Readers rave about The Delphi Trilogy:

“Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”

“It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense… and very well written characters.”

“From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”

“Even the most reluctant of reluctant readers will have a hard time putting these books down.”

Categories: Libraries, Readers, Reluctant Readers, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | 6 Comments

The Long and the Short of Library Trips

A trek all the way across Virginia … plus a little “backyard gardening”
Put 8 more libraries on the board. A nice week in Virginia and Tennessee.

Put 8 more libraries on the board. A nice week in Virginia and Tennessee.

The 100-Library Tour got a boost this past week on the road to Williamsburg, VA for a school library conference. En route, I had a nice visit with Jenna at the Pulaski, VA library and she sent me over to the middle school to meet with her form teacher – now librarian – Bob, who told me about his reading programs then insisted I visit Rita at Dublin Middle School one town over.

Later in the day I met David at the Salem Public Library. He accepted The League of Delphi: Book I of The Delphi Trilogy for his collection and jumped online, ordering Book II: The Delphi Deception on the spot! He has a lot of great teen reading programs going and asked if I’m interested in returning to do an author visit. My answer: “Heck, yeah!” See you again soon for a group event, Salem!

How many school librarians did I meet at the Virginia Association of School Librarians conference in Williamsburg? It’s blurry … somewhere over fifty, I’d say. Sat in on some fascinating presentations by librarians who are doing great things to reach their kids and get them engaged in books. Got home Saturday night and caught up on sleep.

Today, I had a little “backyard gardening” to catch up on, visiting the high school and middle school less than a mile away from home. My travels take me far and wide, so I have to remind myself to visit my local schools and libraries between trips. Today was a great day for it. Now our local schools have The League of Delphi and I hope to do some reading and writing programs with them soon.

I can’t say enough how grateful I am for the warmth and generosity of each librarian I visit. In my day, libraries were a place to sit down and shut up. Nothing wrong with a little silence once in a while – I’m a fan. These days, though, I see librarians trying to create an active and engaging environment for their teens, less focused on the old rules, more interested in the content and purpose of the library. And they do it with a welcoming heart, a desire to help, and a strong sense of service to their kids.

Tomorrow I head off to the Southeastern Library Association conference in Greeneville, SC and will visit libraries on the way.

Want to know how all this got started? Check it out here.

Also, follow my progress in photos on Facebook.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 things you miss if you just drive past a library without stopping :

  1. Books speak … but you have to sit down among them and be quiet for a minute to hear what they have to say.
  2. The next love of your life could be in there reading a book. Smart ones are keepers.
  3. Quiet kids focusing their attention on low-tech, high-impact entertainment.

-

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

Paperback amazon Delphi Deception

Delphi 2 kindle

Ingram Delphi Deception

-

What librarians are saying about The Delphi Trilogy:

“The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart is super suspenseful and unputdownable in the best sense of the word. A great readalike for kids who have plowed through Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games. We have multiple copies of the book and they have not been on the shelf since we bought them. Teen patrons have loved The League of Delphi.” – Hannahlily Smith, Teen Coordinator, Johnson City Public Library, Johnson City, TN.

“Fast-paced and well written, this thrilling mystery sucks readers in and leaves them anxiously waiting for the next installment of the trilogy. This is exactly the type of book teens enjoy and it will draw in even the most reluctant readers.” – Kiersten Doucette, Teen Services Librarian, Naperville Public Library, Naperville, IL

Readers rave about The Delphi Trilogy:

“Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”

“It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense… and very well written characters.”

“From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”

“Even the most reluctant of reluctant readers will have a hard time putting these books down.”

Categories: Libraries, Readers, Reluctant Readers, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

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